Last edited by Dikazahn
Friday, July 24, 2020 | History

2 edition of Venetian gold ducat and its imitations found in the catalog.

Venetian gold ducat and its imitations

Herbert E. Ives

Venetian gold ducat and its imitations

by Herbert E. Ives

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  • 32 Currently reading

Published by American Numismatic Society in New York .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Statementby Herbert E. Ives ; edited and annotated by Philip Grierson.
SeriesNumismatic notes and monographs -- 128
ContributionsGrierson, Philip, 1910-
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL21457437M

Venice, Andrea Dandolo, , gold ducat. The Princeton University Library Numismatic Collection has just received by bequest the Benjamin R. Bell Collection of Ducats. Bell, who worked as a coin dealer and died at a young age earlier this year, was a collector and scholar of the medieval ducats of Venice and their manifold imitations. The Doges of Venice minted an array of coinage flucctuating from silver and gold in the earlier years of the Republic, to bronze in the latter. The last Doge of Venice was Ludovico Manin, who abdicated on upon the conquest of Napoleon. See Also: Medieval Venetian Coins For Sale / The Doges of Venice: A Chronological List.

  A dealer at a show had this Venetian states gold ducat coin originally sold at the ANA convention auction in Buffalo, NY. Lot # He said that the ANA in CO sent him additional details on the coin. Ancient coins expert Allen Berman was at the coin show and I .   Your coin is indeed a Venetian ducat and I'm pretty dang sure it's genuine. It was issued by the Doge Michele Steno It is made of gold and if I grade it correctly it has AU details. Unfortunately, it looks as if your coin was once set in jewlery and is damaged. This would drop the value to around $ most likely.

Subsequently, gold florins were also minted in by Lucca and Perrugia in However, in the first gold ducats, Venetian ducats (aka zecchinos), were approved to be minted. They were supposed to be heavier than florins ( gm instead of gm), but were also struck in pure gold. Minting of gold Venetian ducats started in March ru22 frascatius ancients a beautiful gold ducat / zecchino of paolo renier, doge of venice italy from - ad. a coin of venice from the height of its world powerpossible easter imitation from the same time period sharp venetian gold coin that has been holed this coin was minted by the venetians in % pure (solid) goldthe size is mm and grams.


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Venetian gold ducat and its imitations by Herbert E. Ives Download PDF EPUB FB2

The earliest imitations of the Venetian ducat, most closely resembling their prototype in style, are the series issued in the name of the Roman Senate 22 in the fourteenth and early fifteenth century.

23 They differ from the contemporary Venetian ducats almost solely in their inscriptions. In place of S. VENETI we find S.

PETRVS; in place of. The Venetian Gold Ducat and Its Imitations, Issue Volume of American Numismatic Society: Numismatic Notes and Monographs Issue of Numismatic notes & monographs The Venetian gold ducat and its imitations: Author: Herbert Eugene Ives: Publisher: American Numismatic Society, Original from: the University of Virginia: Digitized.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ives, Herbert Eugene, Venetian gold ducat and its imitations. New York, American Numismatic Society, The ducat (/ ˈ d ʌ k ə t /) was a gold or silver coin used as a trade coin in Europe from the later Middle Ages until as late as the 20th century.

Many types of ducats had various metallic content and purchasing power throughout the period. The gold ducat of Venice gained wide international acceptance, like the medieval Byzantine hyperpyron and the Florentine florin, or the modern British. * The Venetian Gold Ducat and its Imitations by Herbert E.

Ives, edited and annotated by Phillip Grierson. ANS I thank Benjamin Bell of CNG for his informative E-mail from which I paraphrase above, the drawings from Papadopoli and the copy of Ives & Grierson, a very interesting monograph on these ducats.

Ben did his MA dissertation at the. The Venetian Ducats were gold and silver coins that gained international acceptance for the trade between Europe and Asia from the 14 th century BCE to 18 th century BCE.

The word ducat comes from the Medieval Latin ducatus meaning “relating to a duke (or dukedom)”, and initially meant “duke’s coin” or a “duchy’s coin”. 2 Fo ar general discussion of imitations of the ducat see Herbert E. Ives, The Venetian Gold Ducat and Its Imitations, edited and annotated by Philip Grierson (New York, ).

3 A. Raug e van Gennep,' Le ducat ve'nitien en Egypte, son influence sur le monnayage de l'or dan s ce pays au commencement du XVe siecle', Revue Numismatique, ser 4., vol.

The design of the famous Venetian gold ducat, or zecchino, remained unchanged for more than years, from its introduction in and the conquest of Venice by Napoleon's troops in Paulo Rainer was the Doge of Venice before the last, at the end of years of Venetian.

Crusader States Achaia. Robert D'Angio gold Zecchino ND () MS65 NGC, Fra, Ives-Plate XII, 1. A somewhat crude Crusader imitation of a Venetian Ducat of Andrea Dandolo.

Brightly lustrous with uniformly clear detailing for the issue, this gem example ranks as the finest yet certified by NGC. Apparently, Venetian ducats were popular in Africa. So popular that they were imitated in gilt copper.

According to, The Venetian Gold Ducat and its Imitations by H. Ives, New Yorkpage A later and apparently final form of these tokens has the same obverse and reverse type and the same obverse legend, but with the reverse legend. The Venetian gold coins were known as ducats and sequins.

They weigh around grams. The obverse of these coins feature the figures of St. Mark and the Doge or. Description. This ducat – a coin made almost entirely of pure gold – was minted in Venice between and The word ‘ducat’ echoes repeatedly throughout Shakespeare’s play, The Merchant of Venice, revealing interesting tensions surrounding attitudes to money.

echizento I came to a similar conclusion while doing research following Bob L's excellent suggestion. In fact, I came across ad read a fascinating (and free) book titled The Venetian Gold Ducat and its Imitations by Herbert E Ives.

The Venetian Gold Ducat and its Imitations, Numismatic Notes and Monographs, no. The last work was edited and annotated by Philip Grierson and published posthumously, inasmuch as Ives had died on Novem Upon his death, Ives bequeathed to the ANS his extensive collection of gold. The long-established popularity of the Venetian gold ducat or sequin as a medium for international trade in the Levant, is easily accounted for by its unvarying fineness and constant types from its first appearance in the thirteenth century to the end of the Republic in Imitations of the Netherlands gold ducats are easily found all over the world.

In general, imitations are duplications of the master coin (which is a Dutch ducat here) outside its place of issuing. Thanks to external conformation of an imitation and the genuine coin, circulation of the imitation is possible. 2 For a general discussion of imitations of the ducat see Herbert E.

Ives, The Venetian Gold Ducat and Its Imitations, edited and annotated by Philip Grierson (New York, ). 3 A. Rauge van Gennep, 'Le ducat venitien en Egypte, son influence sur le monnayage de l'or dans ce pays au commencement du XVe siecle', Revue Numismatique, ser.

4, vol. The ducat / ˈ d ʌ k ə t / was a gold or silver coin used as a trade coin in Europe from the later medieval centuries until as late as the 20th century.

Many types of ducats had various metallic content and purchasing power throughout the period. The gold ducat of Venice gained wide international acceptance, like the medieval Byzantine hyperpyron and the Florentine florin, or the modern.

Ducat and Zecchino: ancient pure Venetian gold, an incomparable gift for a student who is about to graduate (graduation gift idea) in history, archeology, cultural heritage, etc., or to any person who is passionate about antiques.

The sequin (Italian: ''zecchino'') is a gold coin minted by the Republic of Venice from the 13th century onwards. Conservative Venetians resisted the return of the gold standard for a generation, but finally joined the trend in with the introduction of the ducato d’oro or gold ducat.

The Venetian ducat maintained its ancient standards until the end of the Venetian Republic in the 19th century. The florin also began to be affected by broad trends in European coinage.

The Venetian Gold Ducat and Its Imitations. New York () Johanyak, D. L. Shakespeare’s World. Saddle River, NJ () Ojima, Fumita. The collection of gold coins is particularly rich in the ducats attributed to Italian, Greek, and Turkish minters and later examples struck on the Indian sub-continent; it also includes many examples of significantly lower weight and fineness than Venetian ducats, which Bell argued to be minted to fit into the Byzantine monetary system.